A couple of questions

edited March 2012 in EpicTable Discussion
I'm looking at VT programs right now because there's a possibility I might be getting my old high school gaming group together (virtually) when the 1E AD&D re-releases hit stores in April.



I've never used a VT before. I am what I would consider medium in computer skills, in that I don't know how to code anything, but I'm the one who shows my mom and dad how to get around in Windows and MS Office. If a program has a manual, I can usually figure it out.



That said, how well does Epic Table support 1E AD&D right now? How much work would I have to do for it to run a lot of the underlying mechanics? Do I have to input all the spells, etc., myself? I read through the info on the website but still have questions in these areas.



Oh, and lastly, I realize it's in beta, but I don't see any way to get it. Is it invitation only at this point? Or did I miss a download section.

Comments

  • EOTB;2584 wrote: I'm looking at VT programs right now because there's a possibility I might be getting my old high school gaming group together (virtually) when the 1E AD&D re-releases hit stores in April.
    Awesome--that's exactly what EpicTable's all about!

    EOTB;2584 wrote: I've never used a VT before. I am what I would consider medium in computer skills, in that I don't know how to code anything, but I'm the one who shows my mom and dad how to get around in Windows and MS Office. If a program has a manual, I can usually figure it out.
    EpicTable is designed for ease-of-use. It's still beta, so there are rough edges, but my experience has been that most people get by pretty well. There's not a manual yet, but there are hints and tutorial videos on the support site.

    EOTB;2584 wrote: That said, how well does Epic Table support 1E AD&D right now? How much work would I have to do for it to run a lot of the underlying mechanics? Do I have to input all the spells, etc., myself? I read through the info on the website but still have questions in these areas.
    The tongue-in-cheek answer is that EpicTable supports 1E AD&D as well as your kitchen table does. The more serious answer is that EpicTable is not meant for rules automation. It provides you those things that you really need if you're not sitting around the same physical table--shared maps, handouts, the ability to roll dice. There are ways in which it goes beyond that--for instance, character sheet support is a feature in development--but it's mostly meant to do what you'd do at the tabletop. I consider this a virtue--you don't have to input all the spells...because you all have access to all the spells anyway. My friends and I normally play with EpicTable in one window and the online Pathfinder rules (or whatever we're playing) in another. My personal opinion is that when you try to bake the rules too deeply into the tabletop, you tend get one of two things: a tabletop that's so specific to the rules that it's only suited to your campaign if your campaign is totally by the book in every respect; or a tabletop that requires you to enter so much stuff that you're now a slave to the machine (e.g., you can't just drop an ogre on the table unless you've prepped an ogre). EpicTable doesn't go that route. It lends itself to low-prep, ad-hoc play and lets you handle your rules and adjudication of them--just like you would at your real-world table.

    EOTB;2584 wrote: Oh, and lastly, I realize it's in beta, but I don't see any way to get it. Is it invitation only at this point? Or did I miss a download section.
    You can get the latest beta at http://support.epictable.com.
  • Thanks for the info - can't believe I missed the installer download, lol.



    OK, I have a better understanding of the "mission statement" if you will, of Epic Table. It's to simulate the tools but not the rules.



    So how does that all intersect with the map, then? Let me use the ettin in your video of the desert encounter as an example; What I'm assuming is a player says in the chat window, or over skype or google+, etc., "I'm casting a lightning bolt at 'em" and then rolls their lightning bolt damage (which is probably saved as a dice cup roll for 1-click access). The damage done kills the ettin. Does anything happen on the map? I am assuming no visual effects, but does the ettin figure essentially just stay on the map unchanged with the players and DM understanding that it is dead?



    I'm going to download it and play around; but I ask the above because I'm assuming I can't really simulate that without a game going on.



    Thanks for your answers; I really appreciate them! It's easy to see your program is a labor of love.
  • In your scenario, when the ettin is killed, you have two choices. You can simply select the ettin and hit the delete key--analogous to removing a mini from your battlemat. Alternatively, if you care about where the ettin is, you can drop an image on him indicating his state. I have a little skull and crossbones I use for that. In a later beta, I'll supply a gallery of some of these things that my group has found useful--skull-and-crossbones, poison icon, arrow, X, etc.--but in the meantime, you can add any image you want via the Image button on the Tabletops tab.
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